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Harley Davidson Hummer History

In 1948, Harley-Davidson released the Model 125, a small but sturdy two-stroke road machine of 125cc displacement. After the war, America was ready for economical transportation, and the Model 125 was introduced to fill that need.
DKW RT-125

The Model 125's design was an adaptation of the German DKW motorcycles whose engineering designs were forfeited to the Allies as a part of War Reparations at the conclusion of World War II. In America, Harley-Davidson produced the Model 125. In England, BSA made the Bantam. The U.S.S.R, having control of what became East Germany, also appropriated the DKW designs, and made the Mockba M1A. In Japan, Yamaha also got into the act with the YA-1.

The Model 125 put out a whopping three horsepower. One of its more interesting features was a girder-type front end whose suspension consisted of five large rubber bands. In 1951, the rubber band front end was replaced by a more conventional hydraulic unit, the "Tele-Glide".
1953 Model 165

The Model 165 was introduced in 1953 as a replacement for the Model 125. The larger engine size (165cc) boosted horsepower to 5.5. And restyled sheetmetal gave the Model 165 a much cleaner look than its predecessor.

But the 125 wouldn't be out of the picture for long. It was re-introduced in 1955 as the economy model Hummer. Although the Hummer appeared to be a stripped-down version of the 165, the engine had been redesigned. This new "B" model engine would see service through many newer models. A 1955 Hummer weighed 178 pounds, put out 3 1/2 horsepower and sold for $320 F.O.B.

In 1960, the Super-10 emerged, replacing both the Hummer and Model 165. This new model sported a 165cc engine, but it was the "B" engine that had formerly been available in the 125cc Hummer. This would be the end of the road for the Model 165s "S" engine.

Radical changes were in store for 1962. Three models were available. The 165cc Ranger was a stripped down back-woods version similar to the Super-10, and was discontinued after only one year's production. Rear suspension was incorporated in the street Pacer and trailbike Scat, both 175cc versions of the "B" engine.

By 1966, Harley was hard-pressed to compete with the Japanese invasion. The Sprint-series had been introduced five years earlier and the decision was made to shift small-bike production to Italy. One model was produced in 1966, the Bobcat, which sported an innovative fiberglass "body" similar to the one used on the first Superglides a few years later.

Bike Image Description
1952 Harley Davidson Hummer 1952 Harley Davidson Hummer  
1956 Harley Davidson Hummer 1956 Harley Davidson Hummer Number Produced: 1384
Number known in existence: 22
Engine: Single-cylinder two-stroke, magneto, 125cc

Dimensions
Wheel Base: 51-1/2 in.
Overall Length: 81 in.
Overall Width: 28-1/2 in.

Capacities
Fuel Tank: 1-3/4 U.S. Gallons
Transmission: 1-1/4 Pints

Engine
Number of Cylinders: 1
Type: 2 cycle
Horsepower: 3.5
Piston Displacement: 10.1 cu. in. (125 cc)
Compression Ratio: 6.6 to 1

Transmission
Type: Constant Mesh
Speeds: 3 Forward

Image provided by www.tomgrayvintagecollectibles.com.

1957 Harley-Davidson 165 ST 1957 Harley-Davidson 165 ST Number Produced: 2051
Number known in existence: 38
Engine: Single-cylinder two-stroke, generator, 165cc

Dimensions
Wheel Base: 51-1/2 in.
Overall Length: 81 in.
Overall Width: 28-1/2 in.

Capacities
Fuel Tank: 1-3/4 U.S. Gallons
Transmission: 1-1/4 Pints

Engine
Number of Cylinders: 1
Type: 2 cycle
Horsepower: 5.5
Piston Displacement: 10.1 cu. in. (165 cc)
Compression Ratio: 6.6 to 1

Transmission
Type: Constant Mesh
Speeds: 3 Forward

Image provided by www.tomgrayvintagecollectibles.com.

1957 Harley-Davidson Hummer 1957 Harley-Davidson Hummer Number Produced: 1350
Number known in existence: 18
Engine: Single-cylinder two-stroke, magneto, 125cc

Dimensions
Wheel Base: 51-1/2 in.
Overall Length: 81 in.
Overall Width: 28-1/2 in.

Capacities
Fuel Tank: 1-3/4 U.S. Gallons
Transmission: 1-1/4 Pints

Engine
Number of Cylinders: 1
Type: 2 cycle
Horsepower: 3.5
Piston Displacement: 10.1 cu. in. (125 cc)
Compression Ratio: 6.6 to 1

Transmission
Type: Constant Mesh
Speeds: 3 Forward

Image provided by www.tomgrayvintagecollectibles.com.

1959 Harley-Davidson 165 STU 1959 Harley-Davidson 165 STU

Number Produced: 416
Number known in existence: 9
Engine: Single-cylinder two-stroke, generator, 125cc

Dimensions
Wheel Base: 51-1/2 in.
Overall Length: 81 in.
Overall Width: 28-1/2 in.

Capacities
Fuel Tank: 1-3/4 U.S. Gallons
Transmission: 1-1/4 Pints

Engine
Number of Cylinders: 1
Type: 2 cycle
Horsepower: 2.25
Piston Displacement: 10.1 cu. in. (165 cc)
Compression Ratio: 6.6 to 1

Transmission
Type: Constant Mesh
Speeds: 3 Forward

The Model 165 STU, produced from 1953 to 1959, had a carburetor with a restricted intake port. The carburetors were designed to be used on different sized engines, and "tuned" for a specific application by using an orifice plate with an opening of the proper size for the application. The STU's orifice plate had a smaller opening than standard ST's therefore producing a lower horsepower.

Image provided by www.tomgrayvintagecollectibles.com.

1959 Harley Davidson model 165 1959 Harley Davidson model 165

These are often mistaked for Hummers, but the Hummers are 125 cc. This is the big brother at 165 cc. It is a two stroke hardtail motorcycle with a sprung saddle and front telescopic forks. This bike has the optional Hi Fi red paint that is a metallic deep red. The wheel size is 18". This bike is restored and everything on her is correct for the 1959 year.

Picture kindly provided by www.nemusclebikes.com

1961 Harley Davidson Hummer 1961 Harley Davidson Hummer 165cc Super 10 Hummer, two-cycle, one cylinder, 3-speed.
1961 Harley Davidson Super-10 Hummer Harley Davidson Super-10 Hummer

Harley Hummer Models

Model Year Engine
Model 125 1948-1952 125cc
Model 165 1953-1959 165cc
Hummer 1955-1959 125cc
Super 10 1960-1961 165cc
Ranger 1962 165cc
Pacer 1962-1965 165/175cc
Scat 1962-1965 165/175cc
Bobcat 1966 175cc

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